Articles Posted in Traffic Laws & Information

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The California auto defect and accident lawyers, Bisnar Chase Personal Injury Attorneys, have a section on their website dedicated to explaining California Motor Vehicle Codes. This page is very helpful, allowing visitors to browse laws by topic and number, and find extra information about the requirements of all who use California’s roads. The explanations of the codes do a good job of translating “law language” into clear, everyday language and examples.

The vehicle codes covered on the page range from Section 20001 through 23224. Not every single code is included, but only the most commonly confronted and important codes. The explanations discuss everything from speed limits, stoplights, stop signs, and traffic lanes, to low speed vehicles, riding an animal, the duties and rights of bicycle riders, and how to drive on mountain roads.
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Fountain Valley speed traps have become as common and annoying as the amount of Starbucks I see on my way to work. I mean really, who needs to stop every two blocks to get another cup of coffee? I’ve had enough of the city climbing into my pocket to pull out cash that I don’t have because I am trying to get to work on time and refill that pocket. If you were to ask Cypress law enforcement why they are cracking down so hard, they will probably tell you it is to keep the streets safe from dangerous motorists.

Truth be told, they might have somewhat of a point. In 2006, statistics compiled by the California Highway Patrol’s Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System (SWITRS) showed that four people died and 476 people were injured in Fountain Valley car accidents. Supposedly, setting up speed traps discourages drivers from exceeding the speed limit in areas that are prone to catastrophic injury. Either way, I think there are a few too many bushes with radar guns sticking out of them, and when you come to the following bushes it would be wise to slow your roll.

Heil Avenue between Harbor Boulevard and Newhope Street Speed Trap

According to speedtrap.org, the speed limit drops from 45 to 25 mph due to the school zone. An officer waits on either side of the street, usually in the mornings, before school starts. Eleven users have confirmed that this is a speed trap.

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Since the recession hit, Cypress speed traps are as hard to find as a casino on the strip. It seems as if Cypress police officers are hidden behind every bush on every corner, but the question that plagues motorists is why. Many believe, with good reason, that these are simply ways to increase revenue; pulling over every motorist going slightly over the speed limit amounts to a substantial amount of cash migrating from locals pockets into the state’s. If you were to ask a local officer, he would probably tell you that it is to protect motorists from those who willfully disregard the safety of others.

According to the California Highway Patrol’s Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System (SWITRS) in 2006, 4 people were killed and 172 were injured as a result of Cypress car accidents. Law enforcement is claiming that speed traps are set up in areas that are prone to injury accidents and that their presence has created a warning to those who could end up being a factor in future accidents. No matter what the reason, it would be wise to avoid the following areas if you drive over the posted speed limit.

Holder Street Near Cerritos Avenue Speed Trap

According to speedtrap.org, a motorcycle police officer parks at the west end corner of Holder Street right before Cerritos Avenue. Nine users have confirmed that this is a speed trap.

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Public opinion on Fountain Valley speed traps isn’t particularly in favor; in fact, they are about as favorable as re-electing Richard Nixon. No one likes to be pulled over while they are speeding — if they didn’t have a good reason for it, they wouldn’t have been exceeding the speed limit, but after analyzing the factors that put a speed trap in place, I have become somewhat more appreciative.

In 2006, statistics compiled by the California Highway Patrol’s Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System (SWITRS) showed that 4 people died and 476 people were injured in Fountain Valley car accidents. Law enforcement will tell you that speed traps are set up in areas that are prone to catastrophic injury accidents; if this is true, it would be wise to be extra cautious in the following areas.

Warner Avenue near Ward Avenue Speed Trap

According to speedtrap.org, a motorcycle police officer parks at the entrance to the golf course where Ward ends at Mile Square Park waiting to catch speeding motorists. Four users have confirmed that this is a speed trap.

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Cypress speed traps used to be one of my pet-peeves, however, these days I’m starting to feel a little more sympathy. Personally, I like to go fast; there is nothing much better than flying down an open road without a care in the world. Unfortunately, speeding is one of the main causes of car accidents and many people have lost their lives to the sound of that tune. Although it is easy to blame the city for trying to increase revenue from tickets, at least part of the blame lies in the mirror.

According to the California Highway Patrol’s Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System (SWITRS) in 2006, 4 people died and 172 were injured in Cypress car accidents. Police officers have reacted to these gruesome statistics by setting up speed traps that are prone to catastrophic injury accidents. When approaching the following areas, take into consideration that there’s a chance that you are driving over someone’s grave.

Holder Street Near Cerritos Avenue Speed Trap

According to speedtrap.org, a motorcycle police officer parks at the west end corner of Holder Street right before Cerritos Avenue. Nine users have confirmed that this is a speed trap.

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Dodging Pasadena speed traps is not nearly as easy as it used to be. Police officers are getting savvier on hiding places and are poaching in areas where most cars are driving 10 mph over the speed limit. Although the bombardment of badly concealed law enforcement is hard to live with, Pasadena speed traps might be saving lives.

Statistics from the California Highway Patrol’s Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System (SWITRS) showed that in 2006, 11 people were killed and 1,047 were injured in Pasadena car accidents. When areas become prone to catastrophic injury accidents, police enforcement tend to set up speed traps to help regulate the situation. Whether monetary gain or public safety is the top priority is debatable, but either way it would be wise to exercise caution in the following areas.

Lincoln Boulevard Between Mountain and Orange Grove Speed Trap

According to speedtrap.org, a motorcycle police officer will sit on either side of Lincoln and catch speeders. Eight users confirmed that this is a speed trap.

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Pasadena speed traps never really bothered me, until I witnessed the effects of speeding motorists. Driving by what would have been a safe vehicle, had the driver been going the posted speed limit, and seeing a gruesome distorted hunk of metal, I have come to understand them a bit better. Although the city is making a nice chunk of change from this popular tactic, Pasadena speed traps are put in place to protect people in areas that are prone to catastrophic injury accidents. Getting a ticket is never fun, but I’d take a ticket over a life-changing injury any day.

Statistics from the California Highway Patrol’s Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System (SWITRS) showed that in 2006, 11 people were killed and 1,047 were injured in Pasadena car accidents. When approaching the following areas be safe, and remember that you are not the only person who is in danger when you speed.

Lincoln Boulevard between Mountain and Orange Grove Speed Trap

According to speedtrap.org, a motorcycle police officer will sit on either side of Lincoln and catch speeders. Eight users confirmed that this is a speed trap.
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Most victims who have their cars towed, whether it’s illegal or not, don’t take the necessary steps to fight back and get compensation. Many don’t even know that that their car was towed illegally. They assume that they were at fault, pay to get their car out, and move on with their lives. In Westervelt v. Beach Cities Towing Services Inc. (BCTS), we see an everyday citizen stand up and make it known that he will not be taken advantage of, and his efforts are being noticed throughout the community.

Case Facts

The plaintiff states that on 10/21/2010 his car was illegally towed from a space behind his garage in Rancho Santa Margarita. No warning or notice was given that this was being done; plaintiff states that the driver clearly made an independent decision to tow his vehicle without a PPI (Private Party Impound) or a fire lane sign being present at the location.

Plaintiff’s Arguments

Defendant’s report states that this towing occurred as a result of a general order to tow from MGMT, with no agent of the property owner present at the time of the tow. No name or phone number of such person being present was shown on the report made by Defendant, nor did anyone call to complain about plaintiff’s car being parked behind his garage. Plaintiff further states that defendant’s report falsely states that his car was parked in a fire lane. Plaintiff states that there is no fire lane sign or a painted curb as required by statue to mark a designated fire lane.
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Many blog sites discuss how to avoid a speeding ticket using California’s Basic Speed Law. Unfortunately, many — if not all — of these sites are full of misinformation. Some people claim that CVC section 22351 allows them to drive faster than posted speed limits under the basic speed law. This is not true. The California basic speed law requires drivers to drive at speeds that are safe for the road conditions. This means that you cannot drive 70 mph in a 55 mph zone and claim that you had to do it in order to keep up with traffic and travel “safely.”

The basic speed law does not give you an excuse to exceed the posted speed limits — ever. Maybe you could get by with it in an extreme emergency, but even then, it’s questionable.
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